Tag Archives | Summer 2012 Recipes

BLACKENED STRIPED BASS

by Greg Markert, captain of the Golden Eagle, Belmar

This is Captain Greg’s secret recipe for great-tasting, fresh-caught striped bass or bluefish. It’s hot and spicy, and a flavorful, exciting way to enjoy a fresh-fish dish.

1 whole striped bass, filleted and skinned
Cajun or Creole fish seasoning
(If you’re fishing with Captain Greg, he’ll be happy to provide his own Golden Eagle Cajun mix.)
½ lemon for squeezing
½ lemon plus a bit of chopped parsley or cilantro, to garnish
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Place fillets on a plate and liberally coat both sides with Captain Greg’s seasoning or a good Cajun fish seasoning.

In a heavy skillet or cast iron pan over medium-high heat, swirl butter and oil to coat pan, then heat until just turning brown. Be careful not to burn the butter-oil mixture, but allow it to smoke just a touch.

Place fillets in pan and cook until dark brown or almost black on each side. Carefully remove from pan and place on a warm plate. Squeeze on a bit of lemon juice and garnish.

Side dish suggestions: a good cold potato or bean salad, mango slices, and/or cole slaw.

Grab a nice, cold beer and enjoy! (Serves 2.)

WARNING
As is the case with most large saltwater fish, there are advisory warnings associated with striped bass.These are due to methyl mercury limits and are mainly addressed to at-risk groups such as pregnant women and small children. But the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the American Dietetic Association and the American Heart Association say that the health benefits from eating fish once or twice a week far outweigh the risks. Fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids and it contains essential nutrients for normal development.You know, brain food!

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GRILLED STRIPED BASS

by Tom Schafer

This is a simple recipe that works very well. Grill the fish as soon as possible after catching.

1 whole striped bass, filleted
extra-virgin olive oil
Old Bay Seasoning
sea salt and black pepper
cooking oil spray

When filleting, use a very sharp paring knife to remove all the dark red meat because it has a very strong, offensive flavor. Also remove any remaining pin bones while trimming the fish.

Preheat a gas grill. Slice the fillets into pieces about 6 inches long so they are easy to handle without breaking apart when turning over. Rub the fillets with extra-virgin olive oil. Then season them with Old Bay Seasoning, black pepper and sea salt. Spray hot grill with cooking oil, let it burn off and grill the fish on medium low for about 4 minutes per side. (Serves 4–6.)

WARNING
As is the case with most large saltwater fish, there are advisory warnings associated with striped bass.These are due to methyl mercury limits and are mainly addressed to at-risk groups such as pregnant women and small children. But the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the American Dietetic Association and the American Heart Association say that the health benefits from eating fish once or twice a week far outweigh the risks. Fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids and it contains essential nutrients for normal development.You know, brain food!

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WHOLE ROASTED STRIPED BASS

whole Bass

by Thomas Donohoe

1 28-inch striped bass—about 14 pounds dressed
1 bulb fennel
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 orange
5 large cloves garlic
salt and pepper

Dress the fish at the dock to avoid making too much of a mess at home: scale it, clip the fins off with shears and trim the gills out. With the whole fish dressed, season liberally inside and out with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roughly chop the fennel tops, halve the bulb, core and julienne it, and set aside. Cut the orange into wedges.To crush the garlic cloves, lay a chef ’s knife on top of the cloves with blade parallel to the cutting board, and press down firmly. Stuff the fennel, garlic, and orange into the cavity of the fish.

Place the fish on a roasting pan and roast at 425° for approximately 50 minutes.

Alternatively, dig a ditch in the sand and build a fire in it using natural, real-wood charcoal or hardwood. Be sure to allow the fire to burn down a bit.Wrap the stuffed fish in two layers of aluminum foil and roast over the coals for about 40 to 60 minutes, depending on how hot the embers are. Rotate the fish regularly to ensure even cooking. Serve with grilled corn on the cob. (Serves 4–6.)

WARNING
As is the case with most large saltwater fish, there are advisory warnings associated with striped bass.These are due to methyl mercury limits and are mainly addressed to at-risk groups such as pregnant women and small children. But the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the American Dietetic Association and the American Heart Association say that the health benefits from eating fish once or twice a week far outweigh the risks. Fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids and it contains essential nutrients for normal development.You know, brain food!

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GARDEN STATE COCKTAIL

courtesy of Tom Richter

1.5 ounces Smith & Cross rum (You can also use Banks or another Jamaican-style rum.)
.5 ounce St-Germain
.5 ounce fresh lime juice
.5 ounce simple syrup*
3 Jersey cucumber slices
2 stalks anise hyssop
seltzer

Muddle two cucumber slices with one anise hyssop stalk. Add liquids and shake with ice cubes. (Kold-Draft cubes are recommended here; they’re used in most cocktail bars and come in a variety of sizes. When you shake the drink, these cubes chill it well and froth it up nicely without diluting it too much. If you use regular ice, don’t shake it as long.) Strain into an iced highball glass.

Fill the glass with seltzer and garnish with a hyssop stalk through a cucumber slice. Refreshing... entertaining...yummy...Jersey fresh. The taste of the tropics—right here at home.

*To make simple syrup, use equal parts water and sugar. Heat until sugar dissolves and then cool to room temperature. Syrup can be stored in the refrigerator and also works well for sweetening iced tea.

Editor’s note: This recipe, created by Tom Richter, was the New Jersey winner in a nationwide Can-Can Classic Cocktail Competition recently sponsored by Edible Communities and St–Germain.

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SUMMER-HERB CHEESE BREAD

courtesy of Ellen Ecker Ogden

Baking bread is a forgotten pleasure, and this easy bread recipe is a good place to relearn the basics. This fragrant herbed bread is a simple way to bring the aroma of the garden into your kitchen. —E. E. Ogden

1 quarter-ounce package (2¼ teaspoons) active dry yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
1½ cup warm (105°–115°) water
4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, as needed
1 cup shredded sharp Vermont cheddar cheese or cottage cheese
¼ cup finely chopped fresh mixed herbs (parsley, sage, rosemary, thyme)
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for baking pan
2 teaspoons salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Sprinkle the yeast and sugar over the water in a large bowl. Let stand until the mixture looks foamy, about 10 minutes. Stir to dissolve the yeast. Stir in 1 cup of the flour, then the cheese, herbs, olive oil, salt and pepper. Gradually stir in enough flour to make a stiff dough.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead, adding more flour as required, until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. Gather the dough into a ball. Lightly oil a large bowl. Place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with the oil. Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel, and let stand in a warm place until the dough has doubled in volume, about 1½ hours.

Punch the dough, and turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Lightly oil a large bread-loaf pan, and shape the dough to fit inside. Turn the dough over to coat both sides with oil, and cover again with the damp kitchen towel. Let stand in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 375°. Bake for 45 minutes, or until the loaves sound hollow on the bottom when tapped. Transfer to a wire rack and cool.

(Makes 1 large loaf.)

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ASPARAGUS AGNOLOTTI

courtesy of Bruce Lefebvre, the new owner/executive chef of the Frog and The Peach.

THE FROG AND THE PEACH
29 Dennis Street, New Brunswick
732.846.3216 frogandpeach.com

2 bunches asparagus, washed, dried and chopped, tips reserved for garnish
heavy cream to cover, about 1 cup
1 pound new (baby) potatoes
½ cup shallots, minced
5 garlic cloves, chopped
zest of half an orange
½ cup fines herbes (available dried in specialty food shops)
½ cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated
¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
salt and black pepper, to taste
truffle oil, to taste
2 pounds fresh pasta sheets
all-purpose flour, for work surface

In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-low heat, cook the asparagus in the cream until tender and the cream has reduced and thickened. Pass the asparagus through a food mill into a large bowl. Add the reduced cream.

Place potatoes in a large pot of water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a boil and cook for 10–15 minutes. Drain. When potatoes are cool enough to handle, run them through a food mill (don’t use a food processor—it will make them gluey) and add to the bowl with the asparagus.

In a small saucepan, sauté the shallots and garlic for 1–2 minutes until fragrant; do not brown. Add to asparagus and potato mixture. Add the orange zest, fines herbes, grated cheese, nutmeg, salt and pepper, and truffle oil and mix well.

To blanch asparagus tips for garnish:

Bring a medium-sized pot of water to a boil. Have ready a mediumsized bowl of ice water. Plunge tips in boiling water for 30 seconds, then, with a slotted spoon or sieve, lift them out and place in ice water. Drain tips on a clean, dry kitchen towel.

To prepare agnolotti:

Dust work surface and rolling pin with all-purpose flour. Roll out pasta dough to approximately 1/16th of an inch. Using a pastry brush, brush the circumference of the dough with egg wash (one egg combined with a teaspoon of water) or with water.

Spoon filling in teaspoons onto dough or use a pastry bag to pipe filling onto it, leaving about 1½ inches between each dollop.

Roll out another sheet of pasta of the same size, place on top, and press the edges of the dough sheets together with your fingers to seal. Use a pizza wheel to cut between each dollop. With the tines of a fork, crimp the edges of each agnolotti, using more egg wash or water to seal if needed.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and immerse agnolotti. Boil until they float, then simmer for 3–5 minutes. Drain or remove agnolotti from water with slotted spoon or sieve. Toss pasta with desired sauce (a brown butter sauce is recommended; see our website for recipe), garnish with asparagus tips and serve immediately. (Serves 6–8.)

OPTIONAL: The agnolotti filling can be used as a sauce. Omitting the potatoes from ingredients above, prepare filling and place in a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Add more warm cream, stirring, until the sauce is desired consistency. Serve immediately over linguini (approximately 2 pounds).

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GREEN GARLIC VINAIGRETTE

courtesy of Bruce Lefebvre, the new owner/executive chef of the Frog and The Peach.

THE FROG AND THE PEACH
29 Dennis Street, New Brunswick
732.846.3216 frogandpeach.com

Green garlic, a treat of late spring into early summer, is the sweet, fragrant upper portion of immature garlic. This vinaigrette is a nice topping for fish, asparagus, or grilled or roasted potatoes.

4 ounces chopped green garlic (white part)
2 ounces chopped green garlic (green part)
3 tablespoons green garlic purée made from above ingredients (blanch first; see below)
5 lemons, juiced
2 canned anchovies, minced
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
¼ cup white balsamic vinegar
1 pint olive oil

Blanch green and white parts of the green garlic by bringing a medium- sized pot of water, about 2 quarts, to a boil. Have ready a large bowl of ice water. Plunge garlic in boiling water for 15 seconds, then, with a slotted spoon or sieve, lift the garlic out and place in ice water. Drain on a clean, dry towel. Place in blender with ice and a little oil and pulse.

In a saucepan, sweat chopped green garlic in olive oil for 1 minute. Put the remaining ingredients into a bowl and drizzle the garlic-oil mixture into it, whisking as you go. Use as a topping (Makes approximately 1 pint.)

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